Why Studying Traditional Martial Arts makes sense in 21st century

It can build strong physical and mental health as well as a good social network. And it’s just the start!

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Kung fu group training

I have trained many years in traditional kung fu (white crane), filipino, thai, brazilian (BJJ, capoeira) and japanese martial arts. I heard: “Traditional martial arts don’t work”. “MMA is better than traditional martial arts”. Many find quick arguments on why traditional martial arts training doesn’t make any sense.

The most sensible argument is that we have transitioned from constant warfare to societies of relative peace. The most lethal situation is perhaps a knife or gun mugging – but those are exceptional. The vast majority of us simply do not fear caught in a battle when getting out.

The argument is true. Since traditional martial arts train warriors, traditional martial training is in a way aimless. But so does long-distance running, MMA, football or soccer. No-one runs or plays football to train skills that are required for daily lives.

So why train at all in traditional martial arts?

Continue reading “Why Studying Traditional Martial Arts makes sense in 21st century”

Familiar, repetitive sounds induce sleep

Have soft, familiar and repetitive sound when you sleep

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Ocean sunset

As mentioned earlier, investing in quality sleep is one of the safest and and most durable health strategy.

Smooth, familiar and repetitive sounds produce drowsiness and sleep. Conversely, the lack of these tend to produce alertness and wakefulness.

Research shows sounds which effect a individual are dependent upon his environment. A city dweller may sleep with the steady rumble of traffic but he might find the sound of crickets to be too noisy. Someone who lives in the countryside might respond better to sounds of leaves stirred by gentle wind.

Continue reading “Familiar, repetitive sounds induce sleep”

Prefer Active Recovery to Rest

After a period of hard stress, either sickness or overreaching training, prefer active recovery to complete rest

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Active Recovery

Past burnout, fatigue, a sickness, or an athletic training, it’s tempting to stay in bed, watch TV, read a book or play a video game. That’s what most people think when doctors or mums recommend “rest”.

But it is better to follow an active recovery plan. You can improve blood circulation and increase oxygen brought to muscles and organs. You can decrease stress and get back in touch with friends. These shorten the number of days necessary to reach again your peak. Continue reading “Prefer Active Recovery to Rest”